Surgery

The truth about breast cancer in Brisbane

A new study suggests that the city is far more likely to see breast cancer deaths from a single incident than the national average.

The study, conducted by researchers at the Queensland Cancer Institute and University of Queensland, looked at a sample of 9,737 breast cancer cases in Queensland between 1995 and 2011.

The researchers looked at the time period before and after each incident.

They found that in the first four years after a woman became infected with breast cancer, there was an increased risk of death from breast cancer.

This increase was seen in both men and women, with men dying from breast cancers at a rate of 22 per cent and women dying at an even higher rate of 29 per cent.

The most common reason for death was complications from the disease.

The number of women dying from the illness was also higher than the number of men.

“In our study, we found that the number one reason for breast cancer death was an incident,” said Professor John Brown, lead author of the study and professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Brisbane.

“The more than one incident in a person’s lifetime, the higher the risk of mortality, regardless of age, race or socio-economic status.”

Professor Brown said while the study found that women were at higher risk of breast cancer mortality, the overall risk was low compared to the national rate of 2.5 per cent for women and 2.3 per cent men.

But there were some notable differences between the two groups.

“We saw that men who were diagnosed with breast cancers had a significantly higher death rate than those who did not,” Professor Brown told News.

“This suggests that there may be a risk reduction associated with not being diagnosed, as well as a reduced mortality for those women who do get diagnosed.”

Women were much more likely than men to die from breast disease.

Of the 9,076 women in the study, the average age at diagnosis was 58 years old, and the average annual number of breast cancers was 1.8.

The rate of death for women was four times higher than that for men, but there was no difference between the sexes in the death rates of breast-cancer patients.

“What we found is that women had a much higher death risk than men.

We were surprised by this,” Professor McVey said.

Prof Brown said that although the risk for breast death was higher in men, there were no differences in survival between the genders. “

For women, the rate of breast death is twice the rate for men.”

Prof Brown said that although the risk for breast death was higher in men, there were no differences in survival between the genders.

“Men are less likely to die of breast disease and that is a consequence of being more exposed to the virus and having more exposure to people who have it.”

The survival advantage that men have is due to their greater exposure to breast cancer,” he said.

Professor Mcvey said that while the risk was higher for men in terms of mortality from breast-cancers, there are also some advantages to women for the sake of their own health. “

There are some women who don’t get breast cancer until they are 70, and if they don’t have any other breast cancers, they don, and they have the disease that is not detected by their doctor,” he explained.

Professor Mcvey said that while the risk was higher for men in terms of mortality from breast-cancers, there are also some advantages to women for the sake of their own health.

“If a woman does get breast- Cancer, she has the choice to have the operation or not, so the benefit of having it is quite obvious,” he told News Limited.

“She is better off than if she had the operation and had a bad outcome.”